Sharing some resources developed by our team when implementing Math Modeling Tasks in Elementary Grades!

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Math Modeling Taxonomy of Tasks


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Math Modeling Lesson through Math Happenings (Google folder)

Check out these math modeling lesson Infographics:

Field Trip Dilemma

Too much Texting

Reading Challenge 

Coin Harvest

Marker Crisis,

MOONCAKEs for a Party

 

Field Trip Dilemma

 

Too much Texting

Lunch Count Conundrum

 

Reading Challenge 

COIN HARVEST

School Supply – Marker Crisis  Lesson

MOONCAKEs for a Party    lesson

 

Math Modeling processes

Posing a Problem

Making Assumptions

Do the Math

Building a Model

Evaluating and Revising the Model

Dr. Suh’s Resources on Modeling

Graphic Organizer

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YwtSmcWEnpf-bPJ0qRESvn6Xcx1oN5uFPQ2x0V_ATbA/edit?usp=sharing

Related readings

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Oajd5FYYHWmnfAynPNHCKEb7zZCQTPmT?usp=sharing

Websites with Project Tools

http://completemath.onmason.com/math-modeling/ 

Contact:
Dr. Jennifer Suh
George Mason University

jsuh4@gmu.edu



Our IMMERSION Year 2 groups are off implementing Math Modeling Tasks in Elementary Grades!

Mathematical modeling is a process that uses mathematics to represent, analyze, make predictions or otherwise provide insight into real-world phenomena. Most short definitions we find emphasize this most important aspect, namely the relation between modeling and the world around us. – Using the language of mathematics to quantify real-world phenomena and analyze behaviors. – Using math to explore and develop our understanding of real world problems. – An iterative problem solving process in which mathematics is used to investigate and develop deeper understanding. (Gaimme report, p.8)

Math Modeling tasks use math to make decisions! Some of the types of modeling problems that we have had success in elementary grades include:
* Descriptive models:  Using real world data to describe/represent/ analyze a phenomenon
For emergent math modelers, this would engage them in math discourse that might start with-
I can use math modeling to describe __________.
I can use math modeling to describe how many buses Ms. Green will need to take us on the field trip.
This may lead to a math model like : (# of students + # of teachers + number of parent chaperone)/number of passengers allowed on each bus= number of buses to order for the field trip.
This model may need revising if the modeler found out that the bus allows for 3 students to each seat and 2 adults per seat. (# of students/3)+ (# of adults/2)/#of seats in each bus= number of buses ordered for the trip.

Predictive models: Using trends and data analysis to predict an outcome
For emergent math modelers, this would engage them in math discourse that might start with-
I can use math modeling to predict ______________.
I can use math modeling to predict how many pencils we will sell at our School Store based on our data.
With our Buy one get 2 free pencils sale, if we make at least 5 sales, that would mean
number of pencils sold=5 +2(5)=15.  Some students might be able to say it in words or with a number sentence, while students ready for algebraic reasoning might be able to use variables to represent the model.
P=5+2(5)
P=n+2n

Optimizing models: Using data to find the “best” by optimizing or in some cases minimizing some situation.
For emergent math modelers, this would engage them in math discourse that might start with-
I can use math modeling to find the best ______________.
I can use math modeling to find the “best” way to design an edible garden.
For optimizing models in earlier grade, it provides a great opportunity for students to engage in mathematics argumentation because the criteria for “best” can be determined by the assumptions and constraints they put around the real world problem. For example, Ms. Farmer wants to maximize area with a plot of land  and has 24 feet of fencing or Ms. Farmer has a narrow plot of land that is only 4 feet wide but had lots of room for a long garden or Ms. Farmer wants to use the wall of her house as one side of the garden. These different assumptions and constraints provide lots of different solutions that all could be mathematically viable.

Rating and ranking: Using criteria and mathematical measures as a way to rate and rank options to make decision.
For emergent math modelers, this would engage them in math discourse that might start with-
I can use math modeling to rate and rank to make decisions about  ______________.
I can use math modeling to rate and rank to make decisions about the best college basketball player/team.
I can use math modeling to rate and rank to make decisions about the best vacation spot for our family.
Rating and ranking provides a great way for students to quantify the world around them. This modeling activity is primed for using collected data to make decision. Data scientists use strategies like rating and raking to make important decisions in our daily lives.  Sometimes even exciting decisions like which team to rout for during the March Madnesss game 🙂

 


 


Resources

Dr.  Suh’s Blog Math Happenings

Thinking through a math modeling task

Math Modeling Lesson template

 Math Modeling Talking Points

What do you wonder about?

What do you know or notice?

What information do you need?

What assumptions can you make?

How will you solve the problem?

Does the solution/model make sense when you go back to your problem?

What might you revise and refine in your model to better solve your problem?

 

 Resources

Thinking through a math modeling task

Math Modeling Lesson template

Table 1.

Emergent Mathematical Modeling situations and questions posed and curricular alignment

Grade Level and Topics Math Modeling Questions & Type Curricular Alignment to Math Standards
Planning a Thanksgiving meal

(1st grade lesson)

How much money can we raise through the Coin Harvest?

How can we plan a meal with a $20 budget? (descriptive, optimization)

Students were able to count cubes for each item and them put them all together like counting collections, draw pictures to represent numbers, add up to 20, and a few subtracted down.
Community Service Learning Project

(Grades 1-4)

Donating Food

Sock Drive

(descriptive)

While making Thanksgiving baskets,  students worked to determine the total cost of each of the baskets. To find the best deal for an item led students to learn how to calculate unit rate.
Planning a Trip

(Grades 3-5)

What is the best field trip? (5th grade)

Family day trip (3rd graders)

Optimizing time and minimizing cost/Ranking

Solving single-step and multistep practical problems, using proportional reasoning and planning for the trip using budgetary constraints and elapsed time.
Predicting Texting Usage for a teenager

(Grades 5-7)

Too much Texting (5th-7th) Predictive Describing and comparing data, using ratios, and solve single-step and multistep practical problems, using proportional reasoning.
Running a school store

(Grade 6)

How do we get rid of ‘deadstock’?

Optimizing profits

Solving single-step and multistep practical problem using four operations. Analyzing patterns and learning about linear functions.
 RIVERSIDE Teacher Designers share a Workshop on Modeling
READING CHALLENGE 100,000 MINUTES
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rj7CMw5L_kRWHidgIO6RGhI0xcflsW9x/view?usp=sharing
SCHOOL SUPPLY
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1siz5wU5zHwbq_BIR38jm07nT7pAYXTrKHeeQRUiGqMQ/edit?usp=sharing
Lesson
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1mp_1iblroq2CGc23r6OJkmBUlDr4hMsBwYKvrPk6yOI/edit?usp=sharing
SCHOOL SUPPLY      LESSON STUDY SHARE 1     LESSON STUDY SHARE (PRIMARY)
SCHOOL SUPPLY – MARKER CRISIS  LESSON (1st grade lesson)
LUNCH COUNT
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Fupji-6jy44ypJEkGph1k83xfNSCRYZ5/view?usp=sharing
LUNCH COUNT   LESSON STUDY SHARE (PRIMARY)
LUNCH COUNT CONUNDRUM
PLANNING A FIELD TRIP    
FIELD TRIP
FIELD TRIP LESSON STUDY 1
FIELD TRIP LESSON STUDY 2
FIELD TRIP LESSON STUDY 3
FIELD TRIP LESSON SHARE OUT (PRIMARY)
FIELD TRIP DILEMMA
SERVICE LEARNING
RUNNING A SCHOOL STORE
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1QVC8K-el0Igw1tayv0hexwBeCLspJvCYooClhxZC8ws/edit?usp=sharing
COIN HARVEST
COIN HARVEST    LESSON STUDY SHARE (UPPER)  PRIMARY LESSON  PRIMARY LS SHARE OUT
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1UumK0b3BiP4CmLpO0pUErzlZrmWD4IVK3eIqtU_2-mA/edit?usp=sharing
PLANNING A PARTY FOR A HOLIDAY
MOONCAKES FOR A PARTY    LESSON
PLANNING A SCHOOL CELEBRATION
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1lVvSw8fgskOOp34U60Y5XtQeVm8QjoDtAnrH8moYF50/edit?usp=sharing
PLANNING A PARTY FOR A JAPANESE SISTER SCHOOL   LESSON STUDY
TOO MUCH TEXTING
TOO MUCH TEXTING plan  LESSON STUDY SHARE slides
Collection of 3 Act Math -40 bookhttps://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1o8rBsquU9ofSEf-OV8jriVyx45lrRiOYo2soeH3aJxY/edit?usp=sharing
EDIBLE GARDEN
EDIBLE GARDEN         LESSON STUDY 1      LESSON STUDY 2
Planning tasks
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1JnbwSmSTATRxXbIumkAISHhw7TOznm7_/view?usp=sharing
Our Living Lesson Plans-Mathematical Modeling Pathway
Edible Garden         Lesson Study 1      Lesson Study 2
Running a School Store
Traffic Jam
Planning a Party for A Japanese sister school   LEsson Study
Planning a Field trip    
FIELD TRIP
Field Trip Lesson Study 1
Field Trip Lesson Study 2
Field TRip LESSON STUDY 3
FIELD TRIP Lesson Share out (primary)
Food for Thought
Coin Harvest    Lesson Study Share (Upper)  Primary Lesson  Primary LS Share out
Lunch Count   Lesson Study Share (primary)
School Supply      Lesson Study Share 1     Lesson Study Share (Primary)
TOo MUCH TEXTING  Lesson Study Share